Translation of solution in Spanish:

solution

Pronunciation: /səˈluːʃən/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 countable/numerable (to problem) solution (to sth) solución (feminine)(a algo) to think of/find a solution pensar* en/encontrar* una solución Sally came up with a solution a Sally se le ocurrió una solución the solution to all your problems la solución a todos sus problemas it does not admit of solution, it is incapable of solution uncountable/no numerable [formal] no admite solución, es insoluble
    More example sentences
    • The promotion of the article page was simply a short-term solution to a difficult situation.
    • The decision to divest the business has not been an easy one to make but it is the only solution to a difficult and unsustainable situation.
    • The easiest solution to this situation is to address the issue right in the beginning during the initial audition.
    1.2 countable/numerable [Mathematics/Matemáticas] solución (feminine)
  • 2 c and u [Chemistry/Química] solución (feminine) to make a solution of sth hacer* una solución de algo the aspirin works faster if you take it in solution la aspirina actúa más rápidamente si se la disuelve
    More example sentences
    • Some escapes as carbon dioxide from water solutions and returns to the atmosphere.
    • Unlike common air, fixed air turned lime water (a solution of calcium hydroxide) cloudy.
    • Since soap and detergents are salts, they separate into their component ions in a solution of water.
    More example sentences
    • Typically the host molecules are dissolved in solution or, alternatively, are confined to a membrane plane.
    • Metals usually make positive ions when the compounds are dissolved in solution.
    • This seminar is vital to all scientists who need to characterize polymers or biopolymers in solution.

Definition of solution in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day ochavo
m
old Spanish coin of little value …
Cultural fact of the day

Mexico's muralist movement flourished between the two World Wars during a time of nationalist fervor. It was led by Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros. Their work reflected revolutionary themes and working-class struggle. They decorated many public buildings.