Translation of spectrum in Spanish:

spectrum

Pronunciation: /ˈspektrəm/

n (pl -tra)

  • 1 1.1 [Opt] espectro (m)
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    • If viewed through a prism, however, there is a decomposition of the light into the colors of the spectrum, each with different wavelengths.
    • He has used the spectrum of colours in the rainbow effectively to create an atmosphere of calm.
    • He is shown seated before his famous invention: a ruling machine for producing concave diffraction gratings, which are slightly curved metal plates scored with minutely spaced lines that diffract light into spectra.
    1.2 [Phys] espectro (m) the electromagnetic/ultraviolet spectrum el espectro electromagnético/ultravioleta
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    • Light, the diet of eyes, constitutes a tiny part of the entire spectrum of electromagnetic radiation.
    • In the meantime over twenty presentations internationally have moved to show that across the spectrum electromagnetic fields are genotoxic, that is they damage DNA.
    • But apricot can add a spring-like touch as well, since it falls more in the yellow-orange range of the spectrum.
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    • The adsorption and emission of spectra characteristic of atoms also suggested that they were due to the oscillations of charged particles on the atomic or sub-atomic scale.
    • One method they use, fluorescence spectroscopy, involves recording optical spectra from molecules absorbing and emitting light.
    • It should be noted that immunoglobulins often can be found throughout the electrophoretic spectrum.
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    • The properties ascribed to electrons, for instance, such as their charge and half-integral spin, were themselves responses to quite specific experimental findings involving discharge tube phenomena and spectra.
    • The height of the spectrum indicates the extent of that frequency's contribution to the variance of the growth rate.
    • Radio spectrum can also be mapped in other ways, onto territory.
  • 2 (range) espectro (m), gama (f) a broad spectrum of people un amplio espectro or una amplia gama de gente the political spectrum el espectro político a whole spectrum of opinion todo un espectro or toda una gama de opiniones at the other end of the spectrum al otro extremo del espectro
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    • The budding writers touched upon a wide spectrum of issues ranging from suspense, fantasy, ghosts, sporting rivalry to philosophy and science fiction.
    • You've seen their work in a wide spectrum of venues ranging from Fast Forward to Time magazine, and now you can see it in person.
    • Economic geography supposedly has a wide spectrum of subjects, ranging from agrarian and pastoral economies to resource utilization and changes in land use.

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Churro is a typical Spanish food, consisting of a long thin cylinder of dough, deep-fried in olive oil and often dusted with sugar. Churros are usually eaten with a thick hot drinking chocolate, especially for breakfast.