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splice

Pronunciation: /splaɪs/

Translation of splice in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • splice (together)

    [ropes] [Nautical/Náutica] coser, ayustar; [tape/film] unir, empalmar; [wood] ensamblar to get spliced [colloquial/familiar] [humorous/humorístico] matrimoniarse [colloquial/familiar] [humorous/humorístico]
    Example sentences
    • There are a variety of connectors available that allow you to splice the ropes end to end, in a T-shape, or in a Y-shape.
    • Vantec did a nice job splicing the cables, and binding them nicely with the rubber housing.
    • Without the money for college, he started working for New York Telephone splicing cables in 1966.
    Example sentences
    • Film-makers have dubbed songs over personal footage to create their own music videos while others have spliced sections of different films together to create new plots.
    • Not content with delving into various mediums with which to present their releases, which in the past have been anything from 8 track cartridges to spliced tape segments.
    • Are you constantly shooting a scene multiple times in multiple ways and then splicing your favorite pieces together in the editing room?

noun/nombre

Definition of splice in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.