Share this entry
squeal
American English: /skwil/
British English: /skwiːl/

Translation of squeal in Spanish:

intransitive verb

  • 1 (make noise)
    (person/animal)
    chillar
    (brakes/tires)
    chirriar
    rechinar
    Example sentences
    • Most of the girls around us squealed with delight, but I shivered and chills sprang up on my body - I had been the intended recipient of that wave.
    • The girls squealed with delight as they each grabbed a slice greedily.
    • The three girls squealed in delight and began talking excitedly.
  • 2 (inform) [colloquial]
    cantar [colloquial]
    chivarse (Spain) [colloquial]
    sapear (Venezuela) [colloquial]
    to squeal on somebody
    delatar a alguien
    sapear a alguien (Venezuela) [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • She squeals in protest, and tries to push him off.
    • He jumped, spun clear around in mid-air and took off running in the other direction, squealing in protest and fright.
    • Rynn lowered her head and nudged the small creature gently, but she caught him off guard and he fell over, squealing in protest.
    Example sentences
    • He begins, squealing on the bigger boys anyway.
    • His editor would not challenge and tolerate him, the various and sundry contacts and stoolies would not squeal to him.
    • ‘The reporter never squealed, but he never went to jail, either,’ Janensch writes.

transitive verb

noun

  • (of animal)
    (of brakes, tires) chirrido (masculine)
    with squeals of laughter/delight
    con carcajadas/gritos or chillidos de regocijo
    squeals of protest squeals of pain
    gritos or chillidos or alaridos de dolor
    Example sentences
    • We used the double-pulsed ESPI technique to investigate a brake that had a noise squeal at 5.92 kHz.
    • Funniest of all, though, is the opening squeal of computer noise nonsense that momentarily almost passes for a new Radiohead composition in itself.
    • The children shot in like missiles, the cliffs around echoing with squeals and splashes and Crocodile Dundee-style ‘coo-eees’.
Share this entry
 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.