There are 2 translations of squelch in Spanish:

squelch1

Pronunciation: /skweltʃ/

vi

  • [shoes/hooves] hacer* un ruido como de succión they went squelching through the mud iban chapoteando por el barro
    More example sentences
    • In a nearby part of the forest, a tall figure dashed confidently through the winding trees, the soft earth squelching slightly beneath his feet.
    • The horses' hooves squelched in the muck of the roadway as they crossed to the south end where a faint light glimmered past the edge of the last house.
    • Griffith had abandoned his own horse and was in the midst of walking towards him, his expression one of careful curiosity tinged with concern, his tall black boots spotted with muck as long grass squelched under his feet.

vt

  • (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], aplastar, sofocar*; [person] bajarle los humos a
    More example sentences
    • But the BCFL and the social-democratic NDP have squelched even a protest campaign against the government.
    • Johnny, however, knowing how Jelly couldn't keep a secret, just gave him a look that squelched any further protests.
    • The security police quickly squelched an extremely rare public demonstration demanding political reform on Monday, the 41st anniversary of the Baath Party's seizure of power here.

Definition of squelch in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of squelch in Spanish:

squelch2

n

  • 1 (noise)ruido como de succión
    More example sentences
    • The concrete under foot was cold and unpleasantly damp, with intermittent soft squelches and sharp jabs.
    • A soft squelch from the other side of the tree caught his attention, he peered round.
    • Actually, for most of the time the path was sound, except for spring-fed squelches.
  • 2 (retort) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], contestación (feminine) aplastante

Definition of squelch in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.