There are 2 translations of stew in Spanish:

stew1

Pronunciation: /stuː; stjuː/

n

  • estofado (m), guiso (m) to be/get in a stew [colloquial/familiar] estar*/ponerse* nervioso
    More example sentences
    • No wonder they're in a stew - we keep occupying their territory.
    • Consider all the people who sat home in a stew in 1968 rather than vote for Hubert Humphrey.
    • Hadn't they gotten in a stew with her over him in the first place because of that?

Definition of stew in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of stew in Spanish:

stew2

vt

vi

  • [meat/fruit] cocer* don't let the tea stew (British English/inglés británico) no dejes el té mucho tiempo en infusión to let sb stew in her/his own juice dejar sufrir a algn let him stew (in his own juice) for a while déjalo que sufra or déjalo sufrir un rato
    More example sentences
    • They can be used in spring salads; and their sweetness can be used to remove sourness from food, particularly fruit, so it is useful to add some when stewing rhubarb or gooseberries.
    • Braising, steaming, poaching, stewing, and microwaving meats minimize the production of these chemicals.
    • The chef swore that he did not add gourmet powder to the soup when we asked how he maintained such tasty flavors after stewing the dish on a fire for at least four hours.

Definition of stew in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.