Translation of stifle in Spanish:

stifle

Pronunciation: /ˈstaɪfəl/

vt

  • 1 (suffocate) (often passive/frecuentemente en voz pasiva) [person] sofocar*
    More example sentences
    • The ground gave way as the plants pulled him down, knocking the wind out of his chest, and stealing the air he could have breathed by stifling him with their multitude.
    • When the Indians set fire to the main building as well as the sheds, the flames fanned into a sunburst, and their smoke stifled the people of Fort Mims.
    • Last night I went out and two ladies who were sitting at my table were stifling me with their perfume.
  • 2 (suppress) [flames] sofocar*; [yawn] contener*, reprimir; [noise] ahogar*; [anger/indignation] contener*, dominar; [freedom of expression] reprimir, ahogar*
    More example sentences
    • He stifled his immediate reaction, although he couldn't keep from tightening his jaw.
    • He almost choked on his meat but managed to stifle his sudden reaction to her statement with a hastily gulp of water.
    • He began to speak, but had to stop again to stifle a giggle.
    More example sentences
    • A county judge dismissed that case last April under a California law aimed at discouraging lawsuits that stifle constitutionally-protected activities.
    • Taxes stifle enterprise only if they increase with enterprise.
    • The malfunction of enterprises stifled the growth of innovative designers.

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.