There are 2 translations of stoic in Spanish:

stoic1

Pronunciation: /ˈstəʊɪk/

n

  • 1.1 (person) estoico, -ca (m,f)
    More example sentences
    • The modest, by contrast, realise that, in the sum of history and geography, they're but a tiny, passing crater, and the stoics know that human pain has to be suffered and can't just be railed against.
    • We see livestock dotting the hillsides as we climb and I wonder what sort of doughty stoics would choose to farm such challenging country.
    • And it varies hugely and nearly everybody asks that question largely because they're embarrassed, they know about heroes and stoics who can put up with the most awful injuries and not make any complaints.
    1.2
    (Stoic)
    [Phil] estoico (m)

Definition of stoic in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of stoic in Spanish:

stoic2

adj

  • 1.1 [person/attitude] estoico
    More example sentences
    • His mood seems to have been one of stoic resignation, rather than despair, as reported by James Sharp, a leading Scots Presbyterian.
    • I cannot say these things matter-of-factly: they are too painful, and I have never been stoic.
    • All the handmaidens cheered, but the Lady stood to the back of them, her face stoic.
    1.2
    (Stoic)
    [Phil] estoico

Definition of stoic in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.