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storehouse

Pronunciation: /ˈstɔːrhaʊs; ˈstɔːhaʊs/

Translation of storehouse in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (warehouse) almacén (masculine), depósito (masculine), bodega (feminine) (Mexico/México)
    Example sentences
    • Beside the town of Habuwa are remains of dwellings, storehouses and administrative buildings dating back to the Hyksos and the New Kingdom periods, as well as a great many ovens for baking bread to feed a large number of soldiers.
    • Investigations indicated the fire started from a temporary storehouse at the building's rear adjacent to a boiler room.
    • In addition to the hall there are many other buildings, such as storehouses, guest houses, workshops, stables, servants' houses, a bake-house or kitchen and a stone built chapel.
    1.2 (source) mina (feminine) a veritable storehouse of information una verdadera mina de información
    Example sentences
    • Making use of the storehouse of the unconscious, the automatism of contemporary technologies, and the power of collective action, such groups present us with a truly alternative mode to the production of knowledge.
    • The write-ups are a storehouse of information for future generations.
    • In the environment there is a dimension that resists and escapes us: to reduce the world to a storehouse of materials for limited human purposes is thus to put in question any serious belief in an indestructible human value.

Definition of storehouse in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.