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strategic

Pronunciation: /strəˈtiːdʒɪk/

Translation of strategic in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [Military/Militar] estratégico
    Example sentences
    • In the 15th century artillery emerged as a strategic weapons system.
    • They became too much an organ of the Nazi Party and were used more for its own ends than to help fulfil strategic military objectives.
    • The militants intend to take further advantage of a wider information operations campaign as a strategic weapon.
    Example sentences
    • Several decades ago, the USSR developed nuclear weapons and strategic missiles.
    • During the Cold War, the threat of strategic attack using nuclear weapons dominated air force war planning.
    • Prior to WWII air power advocates considered strategic bombing to be key to breaking enemy production capacity and civilian morale.
    1.2 (important) estratégico
    Example sentences
    • This is a priceless strategic resource, and the Army's major contribution today to the formulation of national strategy.
    • I found that Michael Klare has written an uneven but topical text on strategic resources.
    • For Japan, the South China Sea and the waters off Taiwan are vital for transporting oil and other important strategic resources.

Definition of strategic in:

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Word of the day llanero
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plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.