There are 2 translations of strip in Spanish:

strip1

Pronunciation: /strɪp/

vt (-pp-)

  • 1 1.1 (remove covering from) [bed] deshacer*, quitar la ropa de; [wood/furniture] quitarle la pintura ( or el barniz etc) a, decapar we stripped the walls quitamos el papel de la pared to strip sth away quitar or sacar* algo to strip sb (naked) desnudar a algn we stripped the moldings from o off the walls le quitamos las molduras a la pared stripped of its rhetoric, the speech has no substance despojado de su retórica, el discurso es insustancial
    More example sentences
    • ‘He strips his own bed, does the vacuuming and makes his own pancakes,’ she said with a smile.
    • At least that sheet was there so it saved me stripping the whole bed off.
    • Bearing in mind I had just stripped the beds - why do we always want clean sheets ‘for Christmas’?
    More example sentences
    • Next job is to strip the varnish from the neck, and sand it down to the wood.
    • They run out of beer by about 7pm so we then turned to the wine, which I'm afraid would have stripped the paint off any wall.
    • When the paint was stripped it revealed numerous scratches and old repairs.
    1.2 (remove contents from) [room/house] vaciar* the deserted car had been stripped habían desmantelado el coche abandonado the thieves stripped the shop bare los ladrones desvalijaron la tienda
    More example sentences
    • A troubled theatre was forced to stay closed despite new managers taking over after it was stripped bare of its fixtures and fittings.
    • The geese pull plants up by the roots to feed on them, stripping the ground bare.
    • The house was stripped back to bare walls, rebuilt and extended during the first half of the 1990s and is now finished to a high, modern standard.
    1.3
    (stripped past participle of/participio pasado de)
    (without extras) (American English/inglés norteamericano) (after noun/detrás del nombre) sin accesorios, sin extras it sells for $11,500 stripped se vende a $11.500 sin accesorios or sin extras
    1.4 (deprive) to strip sb of sth despojar a algn de algo to strip a company of its assets vaciar* una compañía, vender el activo de una compañía
    More example sentences
    • Hitler immediately stripped Hess of all the ranks he held in the Nazi Party including being a party member.
    • Kangueehi this week announced that Botes has been stripped of all his powers as chairman of the body's Doping Committee.
    • Even then, Alucius would be stripped of most of his power.
  • 2 [Cars/Automovilismo] [Technology/Tecnología] 2.1 (damage) [gears] estropear 2.2

    strip (down)

    (dismantle) [engine/gun/car] desmontar
    More example sentences
    • We completely strip your machine down to the last nut and bolt then rebuild ensuring every component works perfectly.
    • Johnny developed a life long love for fixing things and could strip a tractor down and put it together again.
    • Police who stripped the van found rope and black adjustable ties.
    More example sentences
    • Getting the screw out can strip the bushing threads in the frame.
    • Don't over do it, or you just end up stripping the screws.
    • I have mounted other things and it felt like you could not tighten things up without stripping the screw in the steel.

vi (-pp-)

  • 1.1 (undress) desnudarse, desvestirse* to strip naked desnudarse to strip (down) to one's underclothes quedarse en ropa interior to strip to the waist desnudarse de la cintura para arriba 1.2 (do striptease) hacer* striptease
    More example sentences
    • Realizing this, we strip off our clothes and dance through the yard.
    • Once I get home, I strip off my clothes, toss them into the hamper and shower.
    • On an impulse you strip off all your clothes, swim into the centre of the lake and turn onto your back.

Phrasal verbs

strip off

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento [wallpaper/paint] quitar; [leaves] arrancar* to strip off one's clothes quitarse la ropa, desvestirse* 1.1verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (undress) (British English/inglés británico) desnudarse, empelotarse (Col, CS, Ven) [colloquial/familiar], calatearse (Peru/Perú) [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of strip in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of strip in Spanish:

strip2

n

  • 1 1.1 (narrow piece — of leather, cloth, paper) tira (f); (— of metal) tira (f), cinta (f) cut the pepper into strips corte el pimiento en tiras to tear sb off a strip o to tear a strip off sb (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] poner* a algn de vuelta y media [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Carefully, she cut several holly leaves out of a strip of green paper and three berries out a piece of vivid crimson.
    • Tape a strip of paper or fabric ribbon around the jar.
    • Even without these boundaries, there are good visual and organizational reasons to put strips of commands at the top of the screen.
    More example sentences
    • This contains a thin, flat strip made of a layer of iron and a layer of brass soldered together, and bent into a coil.
    • Her hand trembled with the effort of keeping the metal sensor strip in place.
    • It is just a long metal strip with a little keypad and monitor on it that will fuse itself to your glove.
    1.2 (of land, sea, forest, light) franja (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • A riparian zone is a strip of land extending on average 10-30m from a designated river.
    • The island was narrow, a strip of land about twenty miles long, running in a north-south direction.
    • An area of 2,000 square metres is equivalent to a strip of land just 100 metres long and 20 metres wide.
    1.3
    (airstrip)
    pista (feminine) (de aterrizaje)
  • 2 (British English/inglés británico) [Sport/Deporte] (no plural/sin plural) (colores (mpl) del) equipo (m) they've changed their strip again han vuelto a cambiar los colores del equipo
    More example sentences
    • This time he donated a strip to the school team in the town of Serekunda.
    • If the jogger was wearing the strip of the team they favoured, they stopped and helped.
    • In the United States, a team strip is actually called a uniform.
  • 3 (striptease) striptease (masculine) to do a strip hacer* un striptease
    More example sentences
    • You don't seem overly concerned in the strip with keeping up a continuous narrative.
    • Excuse self to find the ladies' room, indulging in a private strip for the mirror, just to see if I am sexy at all.
  • 4 (cartoon) (British English/inglés británico) tira (feminine) comic strip tira cómica
    More example sentences
    • Steve also brings us our weekly strip cartoon Back Yard, which you can read on Page 20.
    • In lieu of an entry today, I give you this: the first strip in my new comic series, ‘Scutmonkey’.
    • Born in 1929, Han worked as a strip cartoon artist for the Shanghai Art Publishing House for decades.
  • 5 (exit road) (American English/inglés norteamericano) arteria (feminine) de salida (con establecimientos comerciales, restaurantes etc)
    More example sentences
    • Wesley high school stood in the middle of town just off the main strip of Wesley road.
    • Nelson agreed and they said goodbye as the Ryan women walked out into the main strip of town.
    • On weekend nights dancing, laughing and music can be heard spilling from the bars, clubs and restaurants that line the strip.

Definition of strip in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.