Translation of strive in Spanish:

strive

Pronunciation: /straɪv/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (past tense of/pasado de strove or , strived past participle of/participio pasado de, striven /ˈstrɪvən/)

  • 1.1 (try hard) to strive for oafter sth luchar or esforzarse* por alcanzar algo he strives after perfection lucha or se esfuerza por alcanzar la perfección to strive to + infinitive/infinitivo esforzarse* por + infinitive/infinitivo they strive to please their customers se esfuerzan por complacer a sus clientes he strove to save his marriage trató por todos los medios de salvar su matrimonio
    More example sentences
    • Some people are perfectionists, constantly striving for excellence.
    • Remember that your greatest ethical responsibility is to constantly strive for excellence in everything you do.
    • Kirk and company are always striving to improve themselves, yet they revel in humanity's inefficiencies and imperfections.
    1.2 (struggle) [literary/literario] to strive against sth luchar contra algo
    More example sentences
    • I couldn't believe I was off the boat - the thing sailors strive against at all times.
    • God said to Moses, do not strive against me, or you will die; by faith only can this tribe be saved.
    • I also believe the public intellectual has a position in the community that has to be fought for, striven for.

Definition of strive in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.