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stuffy

Pronunciation: /ˈstʌfi/

Translation of stuffy in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-fier, -fiest)

  • 1 1.1 [air] viciado it's stuffy in here aquí falta el aire, está muy cargado el ambiente
    Example sentences
    • As Derek quickly entered my room, I felt the cool breeze enter behind him, bringing with it welcome fresh air into my stuffy room.
    • Since the room was stuffy and muggy without the air conditioner running all the time, just turning the thing off wasn't an option.
    • Bathrooms tend to be quite stuffy places, where even the hint of a bad smell will linger.
    1.2 [nose] tapado
  • 2 (staid) [colloquial/familiar] [person] acartonado, estirado [colloquial/familiar]; [opinions] retrógrado their parties are very stuffy en sus fiestas hay que andar con mucha ceremonia
    Example sentences
    • For a portable and convenient inhalant put 1 drop each of the same oils on a tissue or handkerchief and inhale them whenever needed to ease laboured breathing and a stuffy nose.
    • One should be on watch for any soreness in the throat, a stuffy nose or congested chest because they are the early symptoms of the onset of disease.
    • Common symptoms include a runny and/or stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat and cough.
    Example sentences
    • Her children are grown, and want her to marry some old, boring, stuffy man who talks about his aches and pains a lot.
    • Kitchen gardeners are very often thought of as stuffy people, patiently planting seeds into precise rows and endlessly digging.
    • Then you just have a bunch of stuffy people, made even stuffier by their uncomfortable clothes, wandering around and lying about what a good time they are having.

Definition of stuffy in:

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Word of the day trascendencia
f
significance …
Cultural fact of the day

El Cid (from Arabic "sid" or "master") was the name given to Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (born Vivar, near Burgos, c1043). He is Spain's warrior hero, being brave and warlike but also loyal and fair. He grew up in the court of Fernando I of Castile and later fought against the Moors, earning the title, Campeador. He married Jimena, granddaughter of Alfonso VI, "the Wise." In 1089, after a disagreement with the king, he and his loyal retainers went into exile, recapturing Valencia from the Moors. He died in 1099 and his deeds are the subject of many oral accounts, the most complete being El Cantar del Mío Cid. His sword, La Tizona, is in a museum in Burgos.