There are 2 translations of subsidiary in Spanish:

subsidiary1

Pronunciation: /səbˈsɪdieri; səbˈsɪdiəri/

adj

  • 1.1 (secondary) [role/interest] secundario subsidiary company empresa (feminine) filial subsidiary subject materia (feminine) complementaria
    More example sentences
    • Roads serving these centres were subsidiary to the main network.
    • Aborigines and other non-European Australians are subsidiary to Ward's analysis.
    • But on any view of the allegations, taken at their highest, the role of the second applicant is regarded as significantly subsidiary to that of the first.
    1.2 (supplementary) [income] adicional, extra; [payment/loan] subsidiario

Definition of subsidiary in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of subsidiary in Spanish:

subsidiary2

n (plural -ries)

  • 1.1 [Business/Comercio] filial (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Most public companies have a holding company and subsidiaries.
    • This is intended to garner tax from foreign subsidiaries of the holding company domiciled in their respective countries.
    • The United States now imposes certain firewalls on bank holding companies and their subsidiaries.
    1.2 (British English/inglés británico) [Education/Educación] asignatura complementaria que forma parte de un programa universitario

Definition of subsidiary in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.