There are 2 translations of superlative in Spanish:

superlative1

Pronunciation: /sʊˈpɜːrlətɪv; suːˈpɜːlətɪv/

adj

  • 1 (excellent) [performance/design/meal] inigualable, excepcional silk of superlative quality seda de primerísima calidad
    More example sentences
    • It also makes one wonder how many superlative pieces of literature might be lurking out there, forgotten.
    • He was supposed to be recognized for his superlative skill with flight combat and drafted immediately into the test pilot corps.
    • At that time it was a contemporary drama; now it is a period piece, and the transition is managed with superlative intelligence.
  • 2 [Linguistics/Lingüística] superlativo the superlative form el superlativo
    More example sentences
    • The result was a phenomenal success and classical music critics around the world competed with each other to invent ever-new terms of superlative praise.

Definition of superlative in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of superlative in Spanish:

superlative2

n

  • superlativo (masculine) in the superlative en superlativo he spoke in superlatives about our project se deshizo en elogios al referirse a nuestro proyecto
    More example sentences
    • It does so most often in the form of the comparative and the superlative of bad: worse and worst.

Definition of superlative in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.