Translation of tablet in Spanish:

tablet

Pronunciation: /ˈtæblət; ˈtæblɪt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (pill) pastilla (feminine), comprimido (masculine) 1.2 (of soap) (British English/inglés británico) pastilla (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Before the ‘boys’ came along everything at the factory was done by hand - including cutting the soap into bars or tablets.
    1.3 (plaque) placa (feminine); (commemorative, of stone) lápida (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • As if memories were not enough, two stone tablets with inscriptions and a copper plate were unearthed from inside the church.
    • Any significant ancient ruler required a personal seal for signing clay tablets and other inscriptions.
    • Many of these Han burials were readily identifiable by inscribed stone stelae, tablets recording the name, titles, and dates of the deceased.
    1.4 (for writing) [History/Historia] tablilla (feminine) 1.5 (pad of paper) bloc (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Legal pad enthusiasts do seem to have a psychological connection to their writing tablets.
    • It consisted of a video of a little girl's hand clasping a pencil and writing on a tablet.
    • Pulling his writing tablet from his harness pouch, Alan retrieved the pen he'd placed in the side of his war collar.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.