Translation of take on in Spanish:

take on

  • 1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 1.1 (take aboard) [passengers] recoger*; [merchandise] cargar* to take on fuel repostar 1.2 (employ) [staff] contratar, tomar (especially Latin America/especialmente América Latina) 1.3 (undertake) [work] encargarse* de, hacerse* cargo de; [responsibility/role] asumir; [client/patient] aceptar, tomar she takes on too much se echa demasiado encima, se carga de responsabilidades nobody wants to take the job on nadie quiere encargarse or hacerse cargo del trabajo 1.4 (tackle) [opponent] enfrentarse a, aceptar el reto de; [problem/issue] abordar their company can't take on the European giants su compañía no está en condiciones de enfrentarse a los gigantes europeos I bet $20 he wins: who'll take me on? apuesto 20 dólares a que gana ¿quién me acepta la apuesta?
  • 2verb + adverb + object/verbo + adverbio + complemento (assume) [expression] adoptar; [appearance] adquirir*, asumir the leaves take on a reddish hue las hojas adquieren una tonalidad rojiza the town took on an air of festivity el pueblo asumió un aire festivo
  • 3verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (distress oneself) [dated/anticuado] don't take on so no te pongas así
See parent entry: take

Definition of take on in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.