Translation of tan in Spanish:

tan

Pronunciation: /tæn/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (-nn-)

  • 1.1 [leather/hide] curtir
    More example sentences
    • They also came from the odiferous chemicals used to tan animal hides into leather.
    • On the second night, after a long day spent scraping and stretching and tanning a deer skin, he asked me what I was hiding from.
    • The next day he taught us how to tan the skin, and make weapons and tools from the bones.
    1.2 [sun] poner* moreno, broncear, tostar*, quemar (Latin America/América Latina) 1.3
    (tanned past participle of/participio pasado de)
    [body/face] bronceado, moreno
    More example sentences
    • It was a Japanese-American tanned girl with brown eyes, a red spaghetti strap dress with a yellow star and a wand.
    • A few minutes later the door opened and a small, pretty tanned girl with straight brown hair walked in.
    • The chiseled features had always been tanned deeply by the sun.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (-nn-)

  • (become suntanned) broncearse, ponerse* moreno, quemarse (Latin America/América Latina) to tan easily broncearse or ponerse* moreno con facilidad I don't tan yo no me pongo moreno
    More example sentences
    • He had pale skin, but it was March, and even then I understood that people tanned in summer and lost color in winter.
    • In case you are thinking why there is a line above the gstring tanline, I was tanning with a rather high-waist normal bikini bottom at first.
    • Whether you're tanning on the beach or staying cool at the mall, these glosses will be perfect for subtle shine or a high powered sheen.

noun/nombre

adjective/adjetivo

Definition of tan in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.