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tangerine

Pronunciation: /ˌtændʒəˈriːn/

Translation of tangerine in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 [Botany/Botánica] [Cookery/Cocina] (fruit) mandarina (feminine), tangerina (feminine); (tree) mandarino (masculine), tangerino (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Oranges and tangerines grow in the hilly regions of Nepal; mangoes in the Terai, the plain in the south of the country.
    • Arrange the lemon, tangerine, and blood orange segments on top and around the mousse cake.
    • Do you know those plastic string mesh bags they use to pack oranges, tangerines and grapefruit in?
    Example sentences
    • In his kitchen – a tangerine tree and redolent jasmine that he planted just outside – he seems a little sad, beaten.
    • Cherries, peaches, figs, apples, tangerines, lemons, and limes are among the many types of fruit trees that thrive in containers.
    • The court heard that an employee who was on the estate at 6 pm on February 6, 2004, noticed a tangerine tree shaking.
    1.2 (color) naranja (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) naranja (invariable adjective/adjetivo invariable)
    Example sentences
    • This spring and summer, white and cream colour schemes are accessorised with fruity colours such as tangerine, pink and lime green.
    • Blossoms are vibrant in bouquets too, especially when they're mixed in shades of deep orange-red, tangerine, and peach.
    • Now there is no denying some people don't suit certain colours ever, and in fairness some colours don't suit people ever viz. tangerine (but that is another story) so be careful.

Definition of tangerine in:

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Word of the day trascendencia
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significance …
Cultural fact of the day

El Cid (from Arabic "sid" or "master") was the name given to Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (born Vivar, near Burgos, c1043). He is Spain's warrior hero, being brave and warlike but also loyal and fair. He grew up in the court of Fernando I of Castile and later fought against the Moors, earning the title, Campeador. He married Jimena, granddaughter of Alfonso VI, "the Wise." In 1089, after a disagreement with the king, he and his loyal retainers went into exile, recapturing Valencia from the Moors. He died in 1099 and his deeds are the subject of many oral accounts, the most complete being El Cantar del Mío Cid. His sword, La Tizona, is in a museum in Burgos.