Translation of tarty in Spanish:

tarty

Pronunciation: /ˈtɑːrti; ˈtɑːti/

adjective/adjetivo

  • [colloquial/familiar] [woman] con pinta de ordinaria [colloquial/familiar]; [clothes] de putilla [colloquial/familiar], de fulana [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • They lingered at the entrance to a bar and watched a tarty lady with a spiky black wig and false red nails attempt to entice a fat German tourist.
    • Rebecca is best known for playing Karen in Paul Abbott's Shameless, the mouthy and tarty daughter of Frank's girlfriend, Sheila.
    • These days, it's mainly host to cheesy 70s and student nights - just drive past on any Saturday and you're bound to see packs of tarty girls fighting over taxis and being sick in the gutter.
    More example sentences
    • Normally, you would notice the danger signs - the need for control, the short attention span, the tarty clothes, the insatiable insecurity, the hunger for excitement - and take appropriate action.
    • After I had dismissed the skin inflaming make-up and the tatty plastic jewellery, all I was left with were surly-looking dolls wearing clompy shoes and tarty skirts that cost the earth.
    • The moral crusader commented that she ‘had seen all sorts of things’ in the seedy back streets of London, but she did manage to raise a smile while looking at tarty outfits in a shop window.

Definition of tarty in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.