There are 2 translations of taste in Spanish:

taste1

Pronunciation: /teɪst/

n

  • 1 u 1.1 (flavor) sabor (m), gusto (m) a strong garlicky taste un fuerte sabor or gusto a ajo it looks good, but it has no taste tiene buen aspecto, pero no sabe a nada to leave a bad taste in the mouth dejarle a algn (un) mal sabor de boca
    More example sentences
    • Three weeks later she complained of a metallic taste and a burning sensation in her mouth.
    • The taste explodes in your mouth.
    • Water supplies in a South Lakeland town are leaving an earthy taste in people's mouths following an outbreak of algae.
    1.2 (sense) gusto (m) to be bitter/sweet to the taste tener* un sabor or gusto amargo/dulce al paladar
    More example sentences
    • Sensory evaluation is analysis of product attributes perceived by the human senses of smell, taste, touch, sight, and hearing.
    • Of the five senses - touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing - which one is most important to a naval aviator?
    • For no spirit could feel things if it were defined under our interpretation of senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing and sight are under no part of the term spirit.
  • 2 (no pl) 2.1 (sample, small amount) can I have a taste of your ice cream? ¿me dejas probar tu helado? would you like some dessert? — just a taste ¿quieres postre? — solo un poquito para probarlo 2.2 (experience) once you've had a taste of the good life … una vez que sabes lo que es bueno or que has probado la buena vida … it'll give us a taste of what we can expect nos dará una idea or será un anticipo de lo que podemos esperar it was their first taste of democracy era su primera experiencia de la democracia a taste of one's own medicine I'll give her a taste of her own medicine la voy a tratar como ella trata a los demás, le voy a dar una sopa de su propio chocolate (Méx) (to get my own back) le voy a pagar con su misma moneda he got a taste of his own medicine lo trataron como él trata a los demás ( or le dieron una sopa de su propio chocolate etc)
  • 3 c u (liking) gusto (m) we try to cater for every taste tratamos de satisfacer todos los gustos our tastes are entirely different tenemos gustos totalmente distintos it's too salty for my taste está demasiado salado para mi gusto my taste is really more for sweet things la verdad es que prefiero las cosas dulcesa taste (for sth) if you have a taste for adventure … si te gusta la aventura … vermouth is an acquired taste al vermú hay que aprender a apreciarlo, el vermú es un gusto que se adquiere con el tiempo I developed a taste for vintage wines les tomé el gusto a los vinos de reserva he has expensive tastes tiene gustos caros to be to one's taste ser* de su ( or mi etc) gusto it's very much to my taste es muy de mi gusto it's not to everyone's taste no le gusta a todo el mundo, no es del gusto de todo el mundo it's a matter of taste es (una) cuestión de gustos add salt/sugar to taste añadir sal/azúcar a voluntad or al gusto there's no accounting for taste sobre gustos no hay nada escrito
    More example sentences
    • The chef has made it more sour and sweet to meet the taste of Southern people and the dish is actually fairly bland.
    • Some say this might weaken the brand power of Reeb, but Huang believes the new Reeb with four flavours may cater to the tastes of more Shanghai people.
    • I tried vanilla coke when it came out, and it was very tasty, but given my addiction to plain diet coke… it was a bit too sweet for my tastes.
    More example sentences
    • The busy silence that occurred before the conductor returned to the stage - like the opening moments of Sgt Pepper's - was more to my taste.
    • My brother and I share the same taste in food, drink and humour but when it comes to cars we disagree.
    • Obviously, it depends on having a decent-sized sample of your musical tastes before it can make sensible recommendations.
  • 4 u (judgment) gusto (m) a person of taste una persona de buen gusto or con gusto she has excellent taste in clothes tiene un gusto excelente para vestirse, se viste con muy buen gusto a remark in extremely bad/poor taste un comentario de pésimo/mal gusto it was extremely bad taste to criticize him in front of her fue de pésimo gusto criticarlo delante de ella
    More example sentences
    • The analysis appreciates Densher's exercise of good taste in his ability to feel Milly's pain and ultimately to repudiate her fortune.
    • That hardly any believers approach aesthetic taste in this way is in no small part the reason we are flailing about today in a culture of ugliness and death.
    • Are standards of taste in music, art, or entertainment being raised, maintained or debased?

Definition of taste in:

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.

There are 2 translations of taste in Spanish:

taste2

vt

  • 1.1 (test flavor of) [food/wine] probar* taste this prueba esto
    More example sentences
    • Critics tasting these wines without food and in large groups often miss wines like these that do not hammer their palates into submission.
    • After our food writers and editors taste each dish, it's first come, first served for the rest of the staff, so it pays to hurry when you smell something good.
    • Then, Kaga and four judges taste the food and pronounce the winner.
    More example sentences
    • To insure good luck in the coming year one must taste all courses, and there must also be an even number of people at the table to ensure good health.
    • Fruit and vegetables were then provided at lunch and school staff rewarded children for tasting them or for eating whole portions.
    • We couldn't have a Greek meal without tasting some baklava, so we ordered one portion to share.
    1.2 (test quality of) [food] degustar; [wine] catar; [tea] probar* 1.3 (perceive flavor) I can't taste the sherry in the soup la sopa no me sabe a jerez, no le encuentro sabor a jerez a la sopa, no le siento gusto a jerez a la sopa (AmL) 1.4 (eat) comer, probar* he hadn't tasted food for six days llevaba seis días sin probar bocado or sin comer nada 1.5 (experience) [happiness/freedom] conocer*, disfrutar de
    More example sentences
    • Before yesterday's match against Dundee, he was unbeaten in 11 outings, tasting victory in eight of them.
    • Nobody has been nominated more often without tasting victory.
    • Last year, in fact, only four Americans tasted victory.

vi

  • 1.1 (have flavor) saber* it tastes bitter tiene (un) sabor or gusto amargo, sabe amargo this tastes delicious esto está delicioso or riquísimo it tastes fine to me a mí me sabe bien, para mi gusto está bien freedom/success tastes good la libertad/el éxito deja buen sabor de boca to taste of sth saber* a algo it tastes of garlic sabe a ajo, tiene sabor or gusto a ajo 1.2 (distinguish flavors) I can't taste because I have a cold la comida no me sabe a nada porque estoy resfriado
    More example sentences
    • Sick of wines that tasted of artificial flavours and chemicals, he confided his frustration to his wife.
    • We foraged for the elusive baski, an absurdly delicious wild strawberry that tasted of cherry and blackcurrant too.
    • The lung was repellently spongy and tasted of bleach.

Definition of taste in:

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.