Translation of tea in Spanish:

tea

Pronunciation: /tiː/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (drink) (masculine) a cup of tea una taza de té a pot of tea una tetera de té tea with milk té con leche
    More example sentences
    • He was making popcorn on the stove and boiling water for tea.
    • Gaunt mothers and children sat near their tents, sometimes boiling water for tea, a ritual of normalcy that they still maintained.
    • Things have changed from drinking plain tea to water to special solutions but one must know the guidelines.
    1.2 countable/numerable (cup of tea) (British English/inglés británico) two teas, please dos tés, por favor 1.3 uncountable/no numerable (leaves) (masculine) China/Indian tea té chino/indio not for all the tea in China [dated/anticuado] ni por todo el oro del mundo
    More example sentences
    • That time Mary McCormack in her little thatched shop kept flour, tea, sugar, salt, lamp oil, and perhaps some liquorice sweets.
    • Canned meats and fish, as well as flour, tea, and sugar, have become important food items as well.
    • At one end of the market, a few stands sold a variety of local spices, sauces, tea and jams.
    1.4 uncountable/no numerable (plant) (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [plantation/grower] de té
    More example sentences
    • The Camellia sinensis tea plant is native to China and commercially produced in tropical and subtropical regions, primarily China, Japan, Taiwan, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka (Ceylon).
    • The tea plant, Camellia sinensis, comes in many forms - black, green, oolong.
    • The filmmaker also found unusual trees: a tea plant, a ban oak, copper beeches, a maidenhair tree in Killarney, and a Kentucky coffee bean tree in Greenside.

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Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.