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tease
American English: /tiz/
British English: /tiːz/

Translation of tease in Spanish:

transitive verb

  • 1 1.1 (make fun of)
    (person)
    tomarle el pelo a [colloquial]
    (cruelly)
    burlarse or reírse de
    they tease me about my lisp
    se burlan or se ríen de mí a causa de mi ceceo
    me toman el pelo por mi ceceo [colloquial]
    they're saying it to tease you
    lo dicen por tomarte el pelo [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • Michael laughed slightly, teasing the dog by tapping him on the side of his head, and then pulling his hand away before the dog could playfully bite him.
    • I know it's silly but I've grown used to my quiet little life, pottering about the house and garden, teasing the cats and tending the plants.
    • A visit to the city zoo was not considered complete unless one teased a monkey and made it snarl or got it to throw back the banana or nuts thrown at it.
    Example sentences
    • Those behind the service claim it will let mobile users ‘flirt, tantalise and tease other mobile users by anonymous text messages’.
    • When she woke up I kissed and teased her.
    • Again, she kissed him, to tease him into state of fiery desire.
    1.2 (annoy)
    hacer rabiar
    he teased her by echoing everything she said
    repetía todo lo que (ella) decía para hacerla rabiar or para fastidiarla
    1.3 (torment) 1.4 (tantalize sexually)
  • 2 2.1
    (wool/flax/fabric)
    2.2
    (hair) (especially American English)
    hacerse crepé (Mexico)
    Example sentences
    • I replied, undoing my ponytail and teasing my hair to make it look a bit better.
    • Her short blonde hair was teased into a bouffant style, but her eyes were hidden by an elegant scarlet mask.
    • Her hair was teased in a messy bun on the top of her head.
    Example sentences
    • Chris teased the last few tangles out of his hair.
    • His gray-green eyes sparkled with laughter and mirth, as he slung an arm around Jess, his hand teasing her hair affectionately.
    • But, however one teases out the strands, the rug remains resolutely tangled.
    Example sentences
    • A fuller of cloth is one who prepares cloth, teasing and thickening it.

intransitive verb

  • don't take any notice, he's only teasing
    no le hagas caso, te está tomando el pelo [colloquial]

noun

[colloquial]
  • 1.1 (person) leave her alone, don't be a tease
    déjala en paz y no la fastidies
    she's a real tease
    (sexually)
    es muy coqueta or provocativa
    1.2 (something that teases) See examples: they said/did it for a tease
    lo dijeron/hicieron en broma or para fastidiar
    Example sentences
    • Being an awful tease, I posted something there recently under the heading ‘The neocons were right!’
    • He's a bit of a tease, too, notes another nurse nearby.
    • Spring Break girls were a tease for the guys and an obvious embarrassment for the parents and grandparents, but it was certainly not a boom for any of the girls.
    Example sentences
    • You ask a lot of him in this role - drag, love scenes with men - and he's presented as a sex object and a tease for other men.
    • This woman is obviously a flirt and a tease who is looking to get into trouble.
    • No one wants to be labeled immediately as the cad, the slut, or the tease; no one wants to be taken advantage of or be seen as an opportunist.

Phrasal verbs

tease out

verb + object + adverb
to tease something out of something
sacar algo de algo
I managed to tease it out of her
logré sonsacárselo

Definition of tease in:

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    Cultural fact of the day

    comarca

    In Spain, a geographical, social, and culturally homogeneous region, with a clear natural or administrative demarcation is called a comarca. Comarcas are normally smaller than regiones. They are often famous for some reason, for example Ampurdán (Catalonia) for its wines, or La Mancha (Castile) for its cheeses.