There are 2 translations of temper in Spanish:

temper1

Pronunciation: /ˈtempər; ˈtempə(r)/

n

  • 1 1.1 (no plural/sin plural) (mood) humor (m); (temperament, disposition) carácter (m), genio (m) to be in a good/bad temper estar* de buen/mal humor or genio to be in a filthy o foul temper estar* de un humor de perros to have an even temper tener* muy buen carácter or genio to have a quick temper tener* el genio vivo or pronto, ser* una polvorilla [colloquial/familiar] to have a vicious o terrible temper tener* muy mal carácter or genio you'll have to learn to watch o control your temper vas a tener que aprender a controlar tu mal genio my temper got the better of me perdí los estribos temper, temper! ¡qué geniecito! [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Gabe stalked over to the weapons rack and pulled down two wooden staves, in a bad temper because his preferred sword hadn't been chosen.
    • Her temper was sweet and calm, much like a sheep's, until she had a blade in her hand, and then she was as quick and merciless as a she-wolf.
    • His temper had not calmed from his earlier encounter with the Johnson twins.
    More example sentences
    • He tends to karate kick the office partition when he's in a temper.
    • Molly stamps her foot in a temper.
    • I have a tendency toward being a bit of a nag to Chris, and I guess I put him in a temper.
    1.2 countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable (rage) to be in a temper estar* furioso or hecho una furia, estar* con el genio atravesado [colloquial/familiar] to fly into a temper ponerse* furioso or como una fiera, montar en cólera [formal] a fit of temper un ataque de furia (before noun/delante del nombre) temper tantrum pataleta (feminine) [colloquial/familiar] 1.3 countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable (composure) to lose one's temper perder* los estribos to keep one's temper no perder* la calma or los estribos tempers frayed as the meeting wore on los ánimos se fueron caldeando a medida que la reunión se prolongaba
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable [Metallurgy/Metalurgia] temple (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • In this connection it is well known that molybdenum additions to Ni-Cr steels can eliminate temper embrittlement.
    • The resistance to atmospheric corrosion is improved and copper steels can be temper hardened.
    • Alloys in the T4 temper are susceptible to room-temperature aging.

Definition of temper in:

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Word of the day madeja
f
hank …
Cultural fact of the day

The CAP (Curso de Adaptación Pedagógica) is a course taken in Spain by graduates with degrees in subjects other than education, who want to teach at secondary level. Students take a CAP in a particular subject, such as mathematics, literature, etc.

There are 2 translations of temper in Spanish:

temper2

vt

  • 1 (moderate) [criticism] atenuar*, suavizar*; [enjoyment] empañar the long wait had not tempered their enthusiasm la larga espera no había disminuido su entusiasmo
    More example sentences
    • The heat is tempered by sea breezes on the coast.
    • The island's climate is semi-tropical; yearlong rainfall keeps it green; heat and humidity are tempered by soft breezes.
    • Always remember, however, that sea breezes will temper the heat and might cool things considerably.
  • 2 [Metallurgy/Metalurgia] templar
    More example sentences
    • Nearly always forged and tempered, stainless steel blades hold an edge well.
    • Quenched and tempered structural steels are primarily available in the form of plate or bar products.
    • Within a couple of years he found himself running a part-time business making custom knives in the purest form - from steel he forged and tempered himself.

Definition of temper in:

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Word of the day madeja
f
hank …
Cultural fact of the day

The CAP (Curso de Adaptación Pedagógica) is a course taken in Spain by graduates with degrees in subjects other than education, who want to teach at secondary level. Students take a CAP in a particular subject, such as mathematics, literature, etc.