Translation of territorial in Spanish:

territorial

Pronunciation: /ˌterəˈtɔːriəl; ˌterɪˈtɔːriəl/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [Politics/Política] [rights/sovereignty/dispute] territorial
    More example sentences
    • The notion of jurisdiction is essentially territorial.
    • Ideas of territorial integrity and the ownership of territory are very strong.
    • Scots emerged as some of the great imperial administrators, they explored the unknown, as soldiers they crushed native opposition and made territorial gains.
    1.2 [Zoology/Zoología] [animal/bird] que tiene un sentido muy desarrollado de su territorio
    More example sentences
    • Males of many species of hummingbird are territorial and the territories, which are usually centered around a food source, are aggressively defended by their owners.
    • Breeding fighting fish are territorial, defending an area around a nest of mucus-coated bubbles floating on the water surface.
    • Further, we have been advised that the wild dogs are very territorial and, if they find any animal in what they consider their territory, they will try to kill it.
    More example sentences
    • They exhibit strong territorial behaviour during the breeding season.
    • Adults are at their lowest weight in the spring as territorial behaviour by the boars and suckling by the sows will have reduced their stored fat to a minimum.
    • Fairly early into the same dive at Edy Point, the first of 5 grey reef sharks came up from the depths, curious but keeping a safe distance and displaying no aggressive territorial behaviour.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.