There are 2 translations of tether in Spanish:

tether1

Pronunciation: /ˈteðər; ˈteðə(r)/

n

  • (rope) soga (f); (chain) cadena (f) end1 1 1
    More example sentences
    • Producers have used two types of tethers (neck and girth); both of which restrict sow movement.
    • With sows kept in tethers in a stall, their movement is restricted with a belt around their torsos just behind the front legs or around the neck.
    • The use of specialized animal stalls and tethers is accepted as a science-based industry standard of management.

Definition of tether in:

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Word of the day rosca
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thread …
Cultural fact of the day

Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.

There are 2 translations of tether in Spanish:

tether2

vt

  • [animal] atar, amarrar
    More example sentences
    • He followed her calmly towards the stakes where the other horses were tethered and being watched.
    • Elephants are tethered by chains so people can climb on them for a cute photo for a fee of 10 yuan.
    • A docile Labrador dog was tethered five metres away from its owner, who was disguised as a tradesman.

Definition of tether in:

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Word of the day rosca
f
thread …
Cultural fact of the day

Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.