Translation of timeshare in Spanish:

timeshare

Pronunciation: /ˈtaɪmʃer; ˈtaɪmʃeə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (system) multipropiedad (feminine), tiempo (masculine) compartido; (before noun/delante del nombre) [apartment/property] en multipropiedad, en tiempo compartido
    More example sentences
    • With seasonal ownership schemes or timeshare you have to be happy that your two weeks holiday per year will have a very high premium.
    • Most of the schemes in Tenerife are timeshare, so there isn't a lot of freehold property.
    • ‘We say to them that there may come a point when they want to exchange their properties, but they say to us we are not timeshare we are seasonal owners,’ he said.
    More example sentences
    • There is legislation protecting you if you buy timeshares and there are many reputable timeshare companies.
    • In the past decade, millions have invested in seasonal homes, from wholly owned multimillion-dollar mansions in Michigan to two-week timeshares in Florida.
    • He said Middleton owned several properties including two premises in Darlington and had timeshares in Florida and Portugal.
    1.2 countable/numerable (property) multipropiedad (feminine); (stake) [ parte en una multipropiedad ]

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Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.