There are 2 translations of toil in Spanish:

toil1

Pronunciation: /tɔɪl/

n

[literary/literario]
  • 1 uncountable/no numerable (labor) trabajo (m) duro, gran esfuerzo (m)
    More example sentences
    • I have discovered that when it comes to physical toil, some work placement students act like consultants.
    • Nevertheless, the joy of knowing that those bookshelves were the result of your own toil and labour can be beyond measure, even if they are a bit wonky.
    • For the most part, food on the journey would be simple: something that stored well and needed little preparation, and yet was hearty enough to give the energy needed for hard physical toil.
  • 2
    (toils plural)
    (snares) redes (feminine plural)

Definition of toil in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of toil in Spanish:

toil2

vi

[literary/literario]
  • 1.1 (work) trabajar duro rescue workers toiled all night los equipos de rescate trabajaron sin descanso toda la noche
    More example sentences
    • Club members had toiled long and hard to build these rooms and the photographers were showing no respect.
    • Hundreds eke out a living, toiling hard throughout the night.
    • At a distance, the cranes, the earthmovers, the construction workers toiled hard and dug deep.
    1.2 (move slowly) to toil along avanzar* penosamente or con dificultad to toil up a hill subir penosamente una cuesta

Definition of toil in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.