Translation of tolerate in Spanish:

tolerate

Pronunciation: /ˈtɑːləreɪt; ˈtɒləreɪt/

vt

  • 1.1 (be tolerant of) [view/attitude/behavior] tolerar I won't tolerate such impertinence! ¡no voy a tolerar semejante impertinencia!
    More example sentences
    • Nor can Bulgaria afford to have its image besmeared again by being seen to be tolerating such practices.
    • No nation can prosper where corrupt practices are tolerated or in some aspects even encouraged.
    • This shocking and disgraceful practice should not be tolerated in any society.
    1.2 (stand, endure) [person/pain/noise] soportar, aguantar, tolerar
    More example sentences
    • Her mother barely tolerated her ex-husband, and he was way down on her list of favorite conversation topics.
    • Robinson had been brought up by a mother who tolerated men, while believing herself superior.
    • Thank you to my colleagues who have supported and tolerated me.
    1.3 [Medicine/Medicina] tolerar
    More example sentences
    • In addition, this medication is well tolerated, with few adverse effects.
    • Antiviral therapy is not highly effective in transplant patients and poses additional problems for these individuals, who may have difficulty tolerating the potent drugs it involves.
    • Patients tolerating the drugs initially are much less likely to develop side effects afterward.

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