Translation of tonal in Spanish:

tonal

Pronunciation: /ˈtəʊnl/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [variation/quality] tonal
    More example sentences
    • The gorgeous tonal colors of this music have rarely glistened so brightly!
    • She manages beautifully subtle shifts in tempo without crossing over into the soupy, and she applies a large palette of tonal color tastefully.
    • The Schubert was likewise a weaving of wonderful tonal colors and pianistic power.
    More example sentences
    • Chinese is a tonal language: words are differentiated not just by sounds but by whether the intonation is rising or falling.
    • The point of a talking drum is to make noises which sound like words spoken in a tonal language - like Yoruba.
    • Also, Chinese is a tonal language, which means that words change meaning depending on whether they're said with a rising tone, falling tone, falling then rising, or flat.
    1.2 [Music/Música] tonal
    More example sentences
    • This makes it difficult for contemporary composers to write interesting new tonal music without evoking a film score of some sort.
    • This process could not go on indefinitely, and in 1908 Schoenberg made the break into atonality, abandoning the attempt to fit atonal harmonies into tonal forms.
    • Add to that the fact that I love Massenet because his music is tonal and well harmonised, and you have some idea of my style.

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Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.