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treasury
American English: /ˈtrɛʒ(ə)ri/
British English: /ˈtrɛʒ(ə)ri/

Translation of treasury in Spanish:

noun plural -ries

  • 1 1.1 (public, communal funds)
    Example sentences
    • Derivatives are commonly packaged as ‘bond-like’ instruments and sold to the knuckleheads that manage things like pension funds and the treasuries of state and local governments.
    • At the same time, the central government was engaged in privatizing moribund state firms and assets, which supplemented the treasury's revenue intake.
    • He adds that it is necessary because, after he raised the corporate tax in the 1990s, funds to the treasury actually fell, as companies used loopholes to avoid taxes.
    1.2the Treasury o the treasury
    el fisco
    el tesoro (público)
    Department of the Treasury (in US)
    Departamento (masculine) del Tesoro (de los Estados Unidos)
    ministerio (masculine) de Hacienda
    (before noun) the Treasury Bench (in UK Parliament)
    los escaños de los miembros del Gobierno
    treasury stock
    (in UK)
    bonos (masculine plural) del estado
  • 2 (anthology) she's a treasury of local anecdotes
    se sabe montones de anécdotas del lugar
    Example sentences
    • As its publicity rightly says, ‘Kate's Kitchen’ is a ‘veritable treasury of gourmet delights’.
    • Some new translations and commentaries of ancient writings are veritable treasuries of ancient popular beliefs.
    • It's a veritable Winnie museum, a treasury of one woman's conceit of herself as the peppery, tartan Boadicea of truth, justice and parliamentary sub-committees.

Definition of treasury in:

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    Cultural fact of the day

    comarca

    In Spain, a geographical, social, and culturally homogeneous region, with a clear natural or administrative demarcation is called a comarca. Comarcas are normally smaller than regiones. They are often famous for some reason, for example Ampurdán (Catalonia) for its wines, or La Mancha (Castile) for its cheeses.