Share this entry

Share this page

trench

Pronunciation: /trentʃ/

Translation of trench in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (ditch) zanja (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Although the analyses were undertaken in trenches parallel to the detrital-authigenic boundary, no decrease in ages was detected within the overgrowth.
    • It also allows the tracks of the excavator to remain parallel to the trench for efficient repositioning.
    • One such spot is the Labyrinth, where deep trenches are carved into Wright Valley, a relatively ice-free area of the continent.
    1.2 [Military/Militar] trinchera (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • I stood in a deep trench with members of various companies waiting for the whistle to jump out and low crawl to the barbed wire.
    • Usually about six feet wide and seven feet deep, the trenches were guarded by barbed wire and machine-gun posts.
    • He thinks to himself that, if it were not for war, he would not be about to go off and kill the fellow just like himself in the trenches on the other side of no man's land, but would be sitting down and having a drink with the man.
    Example sentences
    • Each night more men withdrew in silence until only two hundred and fifty soldiers maintained the front line of trenches where a hundred and thirty thousand had previously defended.
    • The first line of trenches was called front line trenches.
    • Getting decent hot food from the field kitchens to the front line trenches could be impossible when a battle was either imminent or in full flow.
    Example sentences
    • The plaque commemorates some 600 Dawson men who went off to fight in the trenches of France and Belgium.
    • Tolkien was said to have based the battle scenes on his own experiences in the trenches of the First World War.
    • After art school he served in the trenches throughout the First World War, an experience which produced one of his major works and left him with a lifelong interest in warfare and soldiers.

Definition of trench in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day llanero
m,f
plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.