There are 2 translations of trendy in Spanish:

trendy1

Pronunciation: /ˈtrendi/

adj (-dier, -diest)

  • moderno, modernoso [colloquial/familiar] his ideas are very trendy at the moment sus ideas están muy de moda actualmente a bunch of trendy lefties [colloquial/familiar] un montón de izquierdistas progres [colloquial/familiar] she was wearing a very trendy outfit iba vestida muy moderna or a la última moda this part of town is getting very trendy este barrio se está poniendo de moda
    More example sentences
    • Each doll also comes with an extra face plate, trendy fashions and a cool messenger bag.
    • She tries to make it four times a week and rewards her dedication with trendy clothes.
    • If you think their wish list is headed by the latest toys or trendy clothes, guess again.

Definition of trendy in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of trendy in Spanish:

trendy2

n (plural -dies)

  • (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial, pejorative/familiar, peyorativo], persona (feminine) a la moda; [Politics/Política] progre (masculine and feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Selling my label to fashion-conscious trendies and dressing artists, musicians and celebs.
    • Just like French films - in which the Eiffel Tower is visible outside every window - Japanese young trendies all live in slick digs looking out over Tokyo Tower.
    • Good idea until all the young trendies insisted it was cool.

Definition of trendy in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.