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tug

Pronunciation: /tʌg/

Translation of tug in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (-gg-)

  • 1.1 (pull) [sleeve/cord] tirar de, jalar (de) (Latin America except Southern Cone/América Latina excepto Cono Sur)
    Example sentences
    • It stuck like glue and no matter how hard he tugged it, it just wouldn't budge.
    • He murmured, gently tugging my arm and pulling me into his lap.
    • Slowly and steadily I reel it in, remembering Glyn's advice not to tug the hook too suddenly.
    1.2 (drag) arrastrar a boy tugging a heavy suitcase along un chico con una pesada maleta a rastras
    Example sentences
    • Recently, the ship was tugged back to the Steel yard and covered with a tarp for the winter where it will begin renovations.
    • He said the ship was being tugged to a shipwrecking yard when the tugboat's cables broke and high tides pushed the tanker to shallow water where it ran aground.
    1.3 [Nautical/Náutica] remolcar*

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (-gg-)

  • to tug at sth tirar de algo, jalar (de) algo (Latin America except Southern Cone/América Latina excepto Cono Sur) he tugged at my sleeve me tiró de la manga, me jaló la manga (Latin America except Southern Cone/América Latina excepto Cono Sur) to tug on sth darle* or pegarle* un tirón a algo, jalar algo (Latin America except Southern Cone/América Latina excepto Cono Sur)

noun/nombre

Definition of tug in:

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Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.