Translation of unload in Spanish:

unload

Pronunciation: /ʌnˈləʊd/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [ship/cargo] descargar*
    More example sentences
    • When workers began industrial action and refused to unload a plane, two union delegates were sacked.
    • As for moving day, we started loading the first car at about 9.00 on Saturday morning and finished unloading the van and three cars by 3.00 that afternoon.
    • Quin watched the men finish unloading the truck, and head inside.
    More example sentences
    • Lorries and vans blocked two of Bolton busiest main roads, and tempers boiled over as Ashburner Street stallholders arrived to find they could not unload their goods.
    • You're on the highway for up to 11 hours at a stretch, not to mention putting in another three hours a day loading or unloading goods.
    • I now see people walking their dogs, delivery men unloading their goods, students heading to class.
    1.2 (get rid of) [colloquial/familiar] [shares/goods/stolen goods] deshacerse* de to unload sth on sb endosarle or encajarle algo a algn [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • I said nothing, so as not to spoil the evening, but I do not appreciate other people unloading their junk disguised as gifts on us.
    • But if you never really liked them all that well to begin with, this might be a good time to unload them.
    • We unloaded our spare supplies on them and wished them good luck.
    More example sentences
    • It's like I couldn't unload my feelings somehow.
    • Each family member does have moments where they unload their thoughts.
    • This letter doesn't have a huge conclusion; I realize that unloading my fears is probably never going to change the world.
    1.3 (American English/inglés norteamericano) descargar*

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

Definition of unload in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The National Police (Policía Nacional) was set up in Spain in 1976. Its members patrol provincial capitals and big cities, which are responsible for its finance, administration, and recruitment. Although armed, it has never been considered a repressive force, unlike the Guardia Civil.