Translation of upfront in Spanish:

upfront

Pronunciation: /ʌpˈfrʌnt/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 [Business/Comercio] (before noun/delante del nombre) [costs/commitment] inicial
    More example sentences
    • The next day, O'Brien's solicitor sent a letter to another lawyer saying that the options being looked at by the department were either to have no upfront payment, or a maximum cap.
    • The Icelandic airline that flew passengers for collapsed tour operator JetGreen secured a substantial upfront payment and security deposit from the firm.
    • There is a 3 per cent upfront brokerage fee in addition to an annual 1.5 per cent management charge.
  • 2 (open, honest) [colloquial/familiar] [person/statement] franco, abierto
    More example sentences
    • They were asked to support one another, to have conversations even when they were uncomfortable, and to be honest and upfront at all times.
    • But they were very honest and upfront about the conditions of moviemaking.
    • We may not agree with her philosophy in life, but at least she's honest, and upfront with her views.

adverb/adverbio

  • por adelantado it'll cost $1,000, cash upfront va a costar 1.000 dólares, en efectivo y por adelantado it means spending a lot upfront before seeing any return significa gastar un montón de dinero antes de ver ninguna ganancia

Definition of upfront in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.