There are 2 translations of upper in Spanish:

upper1

Pronunciation: /ˈʌpər; ˈʌpə(r)/

adj

(before n)
  • 1 1.1 (spatially, numerically) [jaw] superior; [lip] superior, de arriba the upper storeys las plantas or los pisos superiores upper age limit límite (m) (máximo) de edad temperatures in the upper twenties temperaturas de cerca de 30°C or de casi 30°C the upper tax bracket la banda impositiva más elevada 1.2 (in rank, importance) [ranks/echelons] superior, más elevado the upper chamber oupper house [Pol] la cámara alta upper school (in (UK) ) los cursos superiores
  • 2 [Geog] alto the upper reaches of the Nile la parte alta del Nilo Upper Silesia la Alta Silesia the Upper Danube el alto Danubio upper Manhattan el norte de Manhattan

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of upper in Spanish:

upper2

n

  • 1 1.1 (of shoe)parte superior del calzado leather uppers, man-made soles zapatos de cuero con suela sintética to be (down) on one's uppers [colloquial/familiar] estar* más pobre que las ratas 1.2
    (uppers pl)
    (AmE) [Dent] dentadura (f) postiza (superior)

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.