There are 2 translations of utmost in Spanish:

utmost1

Pronunciation: /ˈʌtməʊst/

adj

(before n)
  • 1.1 (greatest) mayor, sumo with the utmost care con el mayor cuidado, con sumo cuidado of the utmost importance de suma importancia, sumamente importante, importantísimo with the utmost haste/caution con la mayor celeridad/cautela
    More example sentences
    • The training of our nation to respond to the many threats we face is of utmost importance.
    • I am quite possibly a better man for having known him and, for that, he has my utmost thanks and respect.
    • They deserve our utmost respect and recognition for simply making the Olympic team.
    1.2 (farthest) [edge/limit] extremo to the utmost ends of the earth hasta los confines de la tierra

Definition of utmost in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.

There are 2 translations of utmost in Spanish:

utmost2

n

  • to do one's utmost (to + inf) esforzarse* al máximo or hacer* todo lo posible (para + inf) to the utmost al máximo the utmost in luxury el súmmum del lujo, el no va más en lujo [familiar/colloquial]

Definition of utmost in:

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Word of the day rosca
f
thread …
Cultural fact of the day

Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.