Translation of verge in Spanish:

verge

Pronunciation: /vɜːrdʒ; vɜːdʒ/

n

  • 1 1.1 (border) (BrE) borde (m)
    More example sentences
    • The flat verges were littered with seaweed and plastic flotsam.
    1.2to be on the verge of sth to be on the verge of chaos/ruin estar* al borde del caos/de la ruina a species on the verge of extinction una especie en grave peligro de extinción we are on the verge of an agreement estamos a punto de llegar a un acuerdo, estamos a las puertas or en puertas de un acuerdo she was on the verge of tears estaba al borde de las lágrimas, estaba a punto de ponerse a llorar to be on the verge of -ing estar* a punto de + inf they were on the verge of giving up hope estaban ya a punto de perder la esperanza
  • 2 (of road) (BrE) arcén (m)
    More example sentences
    • In north Norfolk we are used to the dramatic appearance of a Barn Owl as it hunts the road side verges searching for small rodents.
    • These days the Trace is a bitumen road, grass verges neatly manicured and mowed for mile after funereal mile.
    • The dog, nicknamed John, appeared on the grass verge by the side of the road in the main street through the village.

Phrasal verbs

verge on

v + prep + o
[madness/melodrama] rayar en, ser* rayano en this is verging on the ridiculous! ¡esto ya raya en lo ridículo! he's verging on 60 anda rondando los 60

Definition of verge in:

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