Translation of verge in Spanish:

verge

Pronunciation: /vɜːrdʒ; vɜːdʒ/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 (border) (British English/inglés británico) borde (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The flat verges were littered with seaweed and plastic flotsam.
    1.2to be on the verge of sth to be on the verge of chaos/ruin estar* al borde del caos/de la ruina a species on the verge of extinction una especie en grave peligro de extinción we are on the verge of an agreement estamos a punto de llegar a un acuerdo, estamos a las puertas or en puertas de un acuerdo she was on the verge of tears estaba al borde de las lágrimas, estaba a punto de ponerse a llorar to be on the verge of -ing estar* a punto de + infinitive/infinitivo they were on the verge of giving up hope estaban ya a punto de perder la esperanza
  • 2 (of road) (British English/inglés británico) arcén (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • In north Norfolk we are used to the dramatic appearance of a Barn Owl as it hunts the road side verges searching for small rodents.
    • These days the Trace is a bitumen road, grass verges neatly manicured and mowed for mile after funereal mile.
    • The dog, nicknamed John, appeared on the grass verge by the side of the road in the main street through the village.

Phrasal verbs

verge on

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento
[madness/melodrama] rayar en, ser* rayano en this is verging on the ridiculous! ¡esto ya raya en lo ridículo! he's verging on 60 anda rondando los 60

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.