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virulent

Pronunciation: /ˈvɪrələnt; ˈvɪrjə-; ˈvɪrʊlənt; ˈvɪrjʊ-/

Translation of virulent in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • [infection] virulento; [attack/opposition] violento, virulento
    Example sentences
    • Mark Oliver Everett is what epidemiologists and Dustin Hoffman call a hot spot, a highly contagious carrier of an extremely virulent disease who infects anyone who crosses his path.
    • And on the nursing front, Alwin notes that there's been an outbreak of atypical pneumonias in Asia, possibly harbingers of a more virulent flu strain to come.
    • There is no question that the outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) has focused the world's attention on the dangers of how easily a virulent disease can spread around the globe.
    Example sentences
    • It becomes more obvious that the options the two Parties present to the electorate, offer the unenviable choice between a raging toothache, a migraine, and a virulent attack of the Farmer's.
    • Over the years, founder Ted Byfield has been particularly virulent in his attacks on the mindset that is increasingly reliant on government handouts and regulation.
    • When word came that Iron Mike had been floored by a virulent attack of the sniffles, his disconsolate well-wishers had to shuffle off without meeting their thick-necked hero.

Definition of virulent in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Zarzuela is a musical drama consisting of alternating passages of dialogue, songs, choruses, and dancing, that originated in Spain in the seventeenth century. Its name comes from the Zarzuela palace, Madrid. It is also popular in Latin America. Zarzuela declined in the eighteenth century but revived in the early nineteenth century. The revived zarzuela dealt with more popular themes and was called género chico. A more serious version developed, known as género grande.