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volley

Pronunciation: /ˈvɑːli; ˈvɒli/

Translation of volley in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 (of shots) descarga (feminine) (cerrada); (of protests, blows) lluvia (feminine) a volley of abuse una sarta or retahíla de insultos a volley of applause una salva de aplausos
    Example sentences
    • Normal war tactics involved massed ranks of lightly armed or armoured archers firing large volleys of arrows into formations of targets.
    • Royal Marines fired three volleys over the grave at the interment.
    • The archers obeyed and sent a volley of arrows onto the heads of the enemy.
    Example sentences
    • Maybe lesser mortals would have been put off by the volley of abuse he directed at her but in the end she triumphed, aided and abetted by passers by and stallholders.
    • My poor buddy didn't know what she had done wrong and could only stare in bewilderment at the volley of words being directed at her.
    • Drunken hecklers were a different matter: the only way to handle them was to unleash a volley of abuse, humbling them with a few crushing put-downs.
  • 2 [Sport/Deporte] volea (feminine) on the volley (in tennis) de volea (in soccer) en el aire
    Example sentences
    • The challenges included running, catching, balancing tennis balls on rackets and practising ground strokes and volleys.
    • He has won each of his first eight service points with a mixture of aces, volleys and ground strokes.
    • The Liverpool striker scored with a volley that took the breath away.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

Definition of volley in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.