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vulpine
American English: /ˈvəlˌpaɪn/
British English: /ˈvʌlpʌɪn/

Translation of vulpine in Spanish:

adjective

  • [formal]
    (creature/habits/diet)
    (cunning/appearance/ways)
    Example sentences
    • Having an interest in all things vulpine, I was immediately hooked, and deserted Mr Waley's book of translations in favour of this new find.
    • He cannot believe that no one has approached him about being Basil Brush's straight man when the vulpine glove puppet resurfaces on TV next year.
    • The case for banning fox hunting - vulpine anxiety, human emotions that are unattractive - is breathtakingly slight.
    Example sentences
    • His vulpine and aggressive disposition is responsible for much of the film's finest moments.
    • The camera often lingers on Penn's face, vulpine in its haughty, unspoken anger and canine in its chronic defeat.
    • The general public probably only vaguely recalls him as an edgy, vulpine presence in such 1960s fare as The Dirty Dozen and Rosemary's Baby.

Definition of vulpine in:

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    Word of the day haughty
    Pronunciation: ˈhɔːti
    adjective
    arrogantly superior and disdainful
    Cultural fact of the day

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