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warden

Pronunciation: /ˈwɔːrdn; ˈwɔːdn/

Translation of warden in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • (of castle, museum) guardián, (masculine, feminine); (of hostel, home) encargado, (masculine, feminine); (of university, college) rector, (masculine, feminine)
    (churchwarden)
    coadjutor (masculine)
    (fire warden)
    (American English/inglés norteamericano) encargado, (masculine, feminine) de la lucha contra incendios
    (game warden)
    guardabosque(s) (masculine and feminine); (of prison) (American English/inglés norteamericano) director, (masculine, feminine) ([ de una cárcel ])
    Example sentences
    • Police in the county now employ around 115 wardens to enforce traffic regulations along with officers, with fines going to central government funds.
    • Each borough council in Lancashire, in conjunction with the county council, has adopted Parkwise and employed dozens of parking wardens to enforce regulations in streets and on car parks.
    • At the end of October the wardens started to strictly enforce the regulations throughout the district.
    Example sentences
    • Professor Jessica Rawson, warden of Merton College, said no able student should be deterred from applying to Oxford by financial concerns.
    • Alan Ryan is a warden at New College, Oxford University.
    • There has been a letter from the warden of Morley College blaming Moloko's for distress to their residents.
    Example sentences
    • He held baby son Ben only once, handcuffed to prison wardens and given no time alone, before Ben died.
    • After leaving the military Kerik worked for a private security firm in Saudi Arabia and served as a prison warden in New Jersey in 1986.
    • Also making the garden safer, 24/7 Security Services provides security and has donated batons and handcuffs for wardens.

Definition of warden in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales