Translation of warden in Spanish:

warden

Pronunciation: /ˈwɔːrdn; ˈwɔːdn/

noun/nombre

  • (of castle, museum) guardián, (masculine, feminine); (of hostel, home) encargado, (masculine, feminine); (of university, college) rector, (masculine, feminine)
    (churchwarden)
    coadjutor (masculine)
    (fire warden)
    (American English/inglés norteamericano) encargado, (masculine, feminine) de la lucha contra incendios
    (game warden)
    guardabosque(s) (masculine and feminine); (of prison) (American English/inglés norteamericano) director, (masculine, feminine) ([ de una cárcel ])
    More example sentences
    • Police in the county now employ around 115 wardens to enforce traffic regulations along with officers, with fines going to central government funds.
    • Each borough council in Lancashire, in conjunction with the county council, has adopted Parkwise and employed dozens of parking wardens to enforce regulations in streets and on car parks.
    • At the end of October the wardens started to strictly enforce the regulations throughout the district.
    More example sentences
    • Professor Jessica Rawson, warden of Merton College, said no able student should be deterred from applying to Oxford by financial concerns.
    • Alan Ryan is a warden at New College, Oxford University.
    • There has been a letter from the warden of Morley College blaming Moloko's for distress to their residents.
    More example sentences
    • He held baby son Ben only once, handcuffed to prison wardens and given no time alone, before Ben died.
    • After leaving the military Kerik worked for a private security firm in Saudi Arabia and served as a prison warden in New Jersey in 1986.
    • Also making the garden safer, 24/7 Security Services provides security and has donated batons and handcuffs for wardens.

Definition of warden in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day bártulos
mpl
gear …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, pinchos are small portions of food, often on a cocktail stick, eaten in a bar or cafe. Often free, they are similar to tapas, but much smaller. There are pinchos of many foods, including Spanish omelet, ham, sausage, and anchovy.