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watery

Pronunciation: /ˈwɔːtəri/

Translation of watery in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (of, like water) acuoso he went to a watery grave [literary/literario] el mar fue su tumba [literary/literario]
    Example sentences
    • He had to be guided through these uncharted, watery jungles.
    • The lymph fluid originates from the interstitial fluid, the watery environment that surrounds the cells of our bodies.
    • Saliva is a watery fluid that helps to wash away and neutralise the acid.
    1.2 [beer/gravy] aguado, aguachento (Southern Cone/Cono Sur)
    Example sentences
    • Their blueberry sauce managed to be thick but watery and tasteless at the same time.
    • Another potential problem is thin, watery paint that runs under the leaf, obscuring its shape.
    • It was a thin meal, a watery gruel tossed into a large pot which each slave was allowed to take five handfuls from.
    1.3 [eyes] lloroso
    Example sentences
    • He could tell that I was shocked because my eyes were watery.
    • She had really been crying in her sleep, she guessed, since her eyes were very watery, and her cheeks felt tight from the dried salty tears.
    • Brett searched her watery eyes and his heart broke for her.
    1.4 [color] deslavazado the paint was a watery blue la pintura era de un azul deslavazado
    Example sentences
    • The light is weak and watery and the air reeks of woodsmoke, but at least it is not raining, a blessing to those who must spend a long, laborious day harvesting olives ahead of the inevitable frost.
    • Anyway, his performance is pretty watery and weak and blah.
    • With a sigh of relief she had watched the steel grey clouds roll away and watery sunshine glimmer through.

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Word of the day vedar
vt
to prohibit …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.