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wealth
American English: /wɛlθ/
British English: /wɛlθ/

Translation of wealth in Spanish:

noun

uncountable
  • 1 1.1 (money, possessions)
    riquezas (feminine plural) [literary]
    a woman of wealth
    una mujer rica or acaudalada or de dinero
    Example sentences
    • Such work has most often been done with the papers of men of national importance or considerable wealth whose papers were substantial.
    • Considered a good people manager, he is a man of considerable private wealth and property.
    • Class evolved through the possession of wealth and property.
    Example sentences
    • ‘We supply them with a wealth of information twice a month,’ she said.
    • And it supplies a wealth of advice on deciding whether to go solo in the first place.
    • Researchers and community activists supplied conference participants with a wealth of ideas.
    1.2 (Economics) (before noun) wealth creation
    creación (feminine) de riqueza
    Example sentences
    • Traditionally, material comfort, wealth, and security are the least of the concerns of forest dwellers.
    • I dislike the fur trade when it exists in order for rich women to display their wealth, and am in favour of it when it helps not-rich people to stay warm in cold places.
  • 2 (large quantity) See examples: wealth of something
    abundancia (feminine) de algo
    a wealth of information/detail
    abundancia or profusión (feminine) de información/detalles
    información/detalles en abundancia or profusión

Definition of wealth in:

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    ESO (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria) is one of the stages of secondary education established in Spain by the LOE - Ley Orgánica de Educación (2006). It begins at twelve years of age and ends at sixteen, the age at which compulsory education ends. The old division between a technical and an academic education is not as marked in ESO, as all secondary pupils receive basic professional training.