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weird

Pronunciation: /wɪrd; wɪəd/

Translation of weird in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-er, -est)

  • 1.1 (strange) [colloquial/familiar] [person/clothes/idea] raro, extraño all sorts of weird and wonderful things las cosas más increíbles she gave us some weird and wonderful explanation nos dio una explicación inverosímil
    Example sentences
    • I love that I can experience different, strange, weird and wonderful things wherever I go.
    • Hundreds of bargain hunters flocked to Leeds at the weekend to snap up the uniquely weird and wonderful outfits being sold by Opera North's costume department.
    • We're going to see some fairly weird and wonderful looking footwear.
    1.2 (unearthly) [apparition/happenings/figure] misterioso
    Example sentences
    • I have managed to unearth yet more weird and almost unbelievable tales from this strange civilisation.
    • Thousands of people have experienced mysterious lights and weird sounds above the ancient fort at Cley Hill during the past 40 years.
    • It was called the ‘Black Hole’ and was as dark and weird as its name suggests.

Phrasal verbs

weird out

verb + object + adverb/verbo + complemento + adverbio (American English/inglés norteamericano)
[colloquial/familiar] weird sb out dejar patitieso or patidifuso a algn [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of weird in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales