There are 2 translations of whistle in Spanish:

whistle1

Pronunciation: /ˈhwɪsəl; ˈwɪsəl/

vi

  • 1.1 (make sound) [person] silbar; (loudly) chiflar; [referee] pitar; [kettle] silbar, pitar; [train] pitar; [wind] silbar, aullar* to whistle to a dog silbarle or chiflarle a un perro he whistled to me to take cover me silbó or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) me chifló para que me pusiera a cubierto to whistle at the girls silbarles or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) chiflarles a las chicas to whistle for sth [colloquial/familiar] if they want more money, they can whistle for it si quieren más dinero, van a tener que esperar sentados [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • When the kettle began whistling, I turned around to get the hot water for my green tea.
    • The kettle began to whistle, and she broke herself out of her reverie and made two mugs of tea.
    • The train whistled and slowly began its entrance to the London station.
    More example sentences
    • Urs Meier, the Swiss referee, appears to have stopped whistling fouls against either team.
    • Referee Karl Kirkpatrick was the dominant figure in the opening exchanges, whistling 13 penalties in the first half before dishing out four yellow cards in the second.
    • Referee Brian Crowe started as he meant to go on: whistling for even the slightest indiscretion.
    1.2 (speed, rush) (+ adverb complement/+ adverbio predicativo) to whistle by [bullet/arrow] pasar silbando shells went whistling overhead pasaban proyectiles silbando por encima
    More example sentences
    • The only sound is the wind whistling through the tall pines.
    • All you could hear was the wind whistling through the stadium
    • I sat there, with the sun beating down on me, the wind whistling in my hair and the sound of a buzzard overhead looking for prey.

vt

  • 1.1 [tune] silbar 1.2 (signal) he whistled the dogs over llamó a los perros con un silbido he whistled the play dead (American English/inglés norteamericano) pitó para detener el juego
    More example sentences
    • He whistled through his teeth, a high pitched sound that grated on the human ears.
    • And so, Peter Howard strolled back towards the lower engine compartment, cheerfully whistling under his breath.
    • The Congresswoman is whistling through her teeth.

Phrasal verbs

whistle up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
1.1 (summon) [dog] llamar con un silbido or con un chiflido, pegarle* un silbido or un chiflido a 1.2 (provide at short notice) [meal] improvisar; [dress] hacer*; [help] conseguir*

Definition of whistle in:

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Word of the day plana
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Cultural fact of the day

The Basque autonomous police force is called Ertzaintza. Its members, called ertzainas, wear a uniform of red sweaters and berets, and white jackets. Despite the Ertzaintza's wide range of responsibilities, the Guardia Civil and Policía Nacional still operate in the Basque Country.

There are 2 translations of whistle in Spanish:

whistle2

n

  • 1.1 (instrument) silbato (m), pito (m) to blow a whistle tocar* un silbato or pito, pitar a factory whistle la sirena de una fábrica as clean as a whistle your lungs are as clean as a whistle no tiene absolutamente nada en los pulmones his record is as clean as a whistle tiene un historial sin mancha to blow the whistle on sb (inform on) delatar a algn (reprimand) llamar a algn al orden to blow the whistle on sth (put a stop to) tomar medidas para acabar con algo to wet one's whistle [humorous/humorístico] echarse un trago, mojarse el garguero [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • The works required four trumpets, three trombones, one tuba, and several percussion instruments including bells & whistles!
    • The music is a unique sound of Irish folk ballads, traditional tunes with vocals accompanied by bazouki, bodhran, harmonicas and whistles.
    • These include harps, lyres, whistles, horns, pan-pipes, bones, psalteries and some form of drum.
    1.2 (sound — made with mouth) silbido (m); (loud) chiflido (m); (— made by referee's whistle) silbato (m), pitido (m); (— of kettle) silbido (m), pitido (m); (— of train) pitido (m); (— of wind, bullet) silbido (m)
    More example sentences
    • As was expected, his special appearance was greeted with whistles and applause that reverberated through the night.
    • The Doc let out a whistle from between his teeth.
    • She was about to explain, when a high-pitched whistle from somewhere in the middle of the soldiers sounded.
    More example sentences
    • The city itself is a spectacle to behold, with dazzling lights, beeps and whistles, and the sound of change going ‘jingle jangle’ all night long.
    • A cacophony of booms and whistles and bangs plays around us, and we eat popcorn and watch the sky explode.
    • Resident orcas are highly vocal and communicate with a learned repertoire of clicks, whistles and squeals.

Definition of whistle in:

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Word of the day plana
f
page …
Cultural fact of the day

The Basque autonomous police force is called Ertzaintza. Its members, called ertzainas, wear a uniform of red sweaters and berets, and white jackets. Despite the Ertzaintza's wide range of responsibilities, the Guardia Civil and Policía Nacional still operate in the Basque Country.