There are 2 translations of whitewash in Spanish:

whitewash1

Pronunciation: /ˈhwaɪtwɔːʃ; ˈwaɪtwɒʃ/

n

  • 1 1.1 u [Const] cal (f), lechada (f), aguacal (f)
    More example sentences
    • The saddlebags had been brought from the stables and rested on a wooden bench near the washstand, already patterned with chips of whitewash flaking from the walls.
    • Never mix insecticides in ordinary lime whitewash.
    • Most Andalusian villages are white since whitewash covers the walls of the houses but only one itinerary in the region is called the Route of the White Villages.
    1.2 c u (cover-up) [colloquial/familiar] tapadera (f) [familiar/colloquial], encubrimiento (m)
    More example sentences
    • They were accused of a whitewash, and the voters expressed their contempt at the ballot box.
    • There are a lot of people saying this was a whitewash designed to protect them in an election year.
    • ‘The families feel we are the victims of a whitewash and a cover-up in order to protect careers of certain individuals,’ he added.
    More example sentences
    • The only better run is by West Indies, who won ten successive Tests against England in the course of consecutive series whitewashes in 1984 and 1985-86.
    • Bubwith's Cliff Harrison and Jill Schofield were the top performers in both matches, including two whitewashes in their match against York, to end the night with 33 games.
    • This followed earlier whitewashes of Heworth and Bootham, the other two teams in the league.

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of whitewash in Spanish:

whitewash2

vt

  • 1 1.1 (whiten) [wall/building] blanquear, encalar, enjalbegar* the graffiti had been whitewashed over habían tapado las pintadas con una mano de cal
    More example sentences
    • Even in smaller houses, plaster was applied to finish interior walls and then whitewashed, painted or easily covered with wallpaper.
    • The few other streets wandered pleasantly past whitewashed buildings, the door frames painted blue or green or purple or red.
    • The Shakers initially whitewashed the plaster walls and painted the interior woodwork.
    1.2 [person/scandal] [colloquial/familiar] tapar [familiar/colloquial], encubrir*
  • 2 (defeat) [colloquial/familiar] darle* una paliza a [familiar/colloquial]
    More example sentences
    • The heroes are mostly whitewashed and predictable.
    • Retrospective media coverage has whitewashed King while ignoring how his messages are radical challenges to the status quo of today.
    • It would be wrong, however, to whitewash him as the last of the old-school, voluntarily resigning statesmen.
    More example sentences
    • Our girls got off to a great start and threatened to whitewash their opponents in the first half.
    • Although the paceman captured 11 wickets in the first two Tests, Pakistan was whitewashed 3-0 in the series.
    • The third and final Test starts on January 2 and the South Africans will face an uphill struggle to prevent being whitewashed in the series, the source said.

Definition of whitewash in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.