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whitewash

Pronunciation: /ˈhwaɪtwɔːʃ; ˈwaɪtwɒʃ/

Translation of whitewash in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable [Constr] cal (feminine), lechada (feminine), aguacal (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The saddlebags had been brought from the stables and rested on a wooden bench near the washstand, already patterned with chips of whitewash flaking from the walls.
    • Never mix insecticides in ordinary lime whitewash.
    • Most Andalusian villages are white since whitewash covers the walls of the houses but only one itinerary in the region is called the Route of the White Villages.
    1.2 c and u (cover-up) [colloquial/familiar] tapadera (feminine) [colloquial/familiar], encubrimiento (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • They were accused of a whitewash, and the voters expressed their contempt at the ballot box.
    • There are a lot of people saying this was a whitewash designed to protect them in an election year.
    • ‘The families feel we are the victims of a whitewash and a cover-up in order to protect careers of certain individuals,’ he added.
    Example sentences
    • The only better run is by West Indies, who won ten successive Tests against England in the course of consecutive series whitewashes in 1984 and 1985-86.
    • Bubwith's Cliff Harrison and Jill Schofield were the top performers in both matches, including two whitewashes in their match against York, to end the night with 33 games.
    • This followed earlier whitewashes of Heworth and Bootham, the other two teams in the league.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 2 (defeat) [colloquial/familiar] darle* una paliza a [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of whitewash in:

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Word of the day cura
f
cure …
Cultural fact of the day

In Mexican politics, a prospective party candidate for the presidency is called a tapado. Candidates traditionally emerge from within the party but their identity is not revealed until the candidate is officially declared: they remain tapados (hidden), thus arousing a great deal of speculation. Under the rule of the PRI - Partido Revolucionario Institucional, its candidate was virtually guaranteed to become president.