There are 3 translations of wild in Spanish:

wild1

Pronunciation: /waɪld/

adj (-er, -est)

  • 1 1.1 [animal] salvaje; (in woodland) salvaje, montaraz; [plant/berries/flower] silvestre; [vegetation] agreste a wild beast una fiera, una bestia salvaje part of the garden had been left wild parte del jardín se había dejado sin cultivar a wild forest una selva
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    • All the sunflowers that were planted last summer were brown, wild shrubs grew abundantly, and weeds consumed the few lilies that were trying desperately to live.
    • Trees are cut down to grow cash crops and wild creatures are shot.
    • Dragons eat any animals they can catch, up to the size of wild pigs, goats, deer, and water buffaloes and occasionally including human beings.
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    • The smell is of locusts and wild honey, like John the Baptist's menu.
    • For £150 a year, anyone can adopt a sheep and in return be sent four kilos of pecorino, wild honey, jams and some woollen jumpers.
    • There are some women's units making excellent bath soaps by adding exotic ingredients like honey, saffron, wild turmeric or sandal.
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    • I think that instilled a love for landscape, for wild places and open spaces.
    • Clearly his is a cack-handed attempt to cash in on the growing public desire to take wild places into the ownership and control of the communities that live around them.
    • I reckon my love of nature and of wild places started out with Romany.
    1.2 (uncivilized) [tribe] salvaje a wild man un salvaje wild and wooly o (BrE) woolly [colloquial/familiar] he was a wild and wooly o (BrE) woolly student in those days en aquella época era el típico estudiante barbudo y revolucionario
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    • Egypt, Donnelly wrote, was their colony, where they tried to civilize wild tribes.
    • But while the colonial powers cast the rebels in the light of wild savages destroying the civilising force of the settlers, it was Africans who suffered the brunt of attacks.
    • Some wild tribes of the distant past no doubt did follow the practice of killing innocent people in revenge for the death of one of their men.
    1.3 (desolate) [country] agreste, salvaje
  • 2 2.1 (unruly) [party/lifestyle] desenfrenado, alocado we've had some wild times together! ¡hemos hecho cada locura juntos! 2.2 (random, uncontrolled) [attempt] desesperado it's just a wild guess es una conjetura hecha totalmente al azar 2.3 (reckless, extreme) [allegation/exaggeration] absurdo, disparatado; [promise] insensato; [imagination] delirante, desbordante it never occurred to me in my wildest dreams that … ni en mis sueños más descabellados se me ocurrió nunca que … they were rich beyond their wildest expectations eran aún más ricos de lo que jamás hubieran podido soñar
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    • ‘They have a wild party but something goes wrong,’ says Welsh, refusing to divulge the secret at the heart of the plot.
    • I still go to wild parties - only they're at Wacky Warehouse and the guest list is made up of screaming five-year-olds.
    • Upon moving in, the duchess became famous for her wild parties.
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    • These figures are no more than wild guesses and not derived from research or sound information.
    • But times are fresh and proof is mostly based on wild innuendo and moral snobbery in these dawn days of post-America.
    • At least with Santa Claus, we know there really was a Saint Nicholas on whom all the later wild stories are based.
  • 3 3.1 (violent) [literario/literary] [sea/waters] embravecido, proceloso [literario/literary]; [wind] fuertísimo, furioso [literario/literary] 3.2 (frantic) [excitement/fury/dancing] desenfrenado; [shouting] desaforado; [appearance/stare] de loco there was a wild rush for the door todo el mundo se abalanzó desesperadamente hacia la salida they went on a wild shopping spree salieron a gastar dinero de forma totalmente descontrolada they were wild with excitement/rage estaban locos de entusiasmo/furia her perfume was driving him wild su perfume lo estaba enloqueciendo or volviendo loco
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    • His struggles were becoming more and more frenzied, a wild look creeping into his blue eyes.
    • Geniuses must have a wild look, their hair must be in disarray, their mind must be in torment on account of their receptivity to divine afflatus, which comes in via the hair.
    • You could see the home fans get a wild look in their eye as naked drummers ran up and down the sidelines riding stick-horses and chanting in the rain.
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    • He's arrived in Boston to address the wild, enthusiastic, over-the-top Democratic Convention.
    • Liz, on the other hand, has strong cultural and familial restrictions on staring, and tends to look very mildly upon people, when she looks at all, even when she's standing in front of a man she's wild about.
    • Henry wants me to try this Vietnamese place he's wild about. Want to come?
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    • She was wild. She just flipped. It was as if she had voices in her head.
    3.3 (enthusiastic) [colloquial/familiar] (pred)to be wild about sb/sth he's wild about her está loco por ella [familiar/colloquial] she's wild about cars la enloquecen los coches [familiar/colloquial] I was never really wild about the idea la idea nunca me entusiasmó demasiado que digamos 3.4 (angry) [colloquial/familiar] (pred) he got really wild se puso hecho una fiera [familiar/colloquial] it makes me wild me saca de quicio, me da mucha rabia, me revienta [familiar/colloquial]
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    • For me the wild seas and the cold were really tough.
    • A few days back I thrilled to a display of wild weather, noting a ‘water spout’ descending from the clouds over Boston during a rain storm.
    • There's something primal and deeply satisfying about sitting indoors, all warm and snug and listening to wild weather beating at the eaves.
  • 5 [Games] (pred) jacks are wild las jotas son comodines

Definition of wild in:

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Word of the day mandíbula
f
jaw …
Cultural fact of the day

Today is Fiesta de Santiago (St James' Day). The famous Camino de Santiago, the pilgrimage of thousands of people from all over Spain and many other parts of Europe to the holy city of Santiago de Compostela, takes place in the week leading up to St James' Day, 25 July. The city also has its fiestas around this time. The streets are full of musicians and performers for two weeks of celebrations culminating in the Festival del Apóstol.

There are 3 translations of wild in Spanish:

wild2

adv

  • these flowers grow wild estas flores son silvestres to live wild vivir en estado salvaje to run wild soccer fans running wild through the streets of the town hinchas de fútbol arrasando desenfrenados las calles de la ciudad these kids have been allowed to run wild a estos niños los han criado como salvajes the garden has run wild la maleza ha invadido el jardín the plants had run wild las plantas habían vuelto al estado silvestre I let my imagination run wild dejé volar la imaginación, di rienda suelta a mi imaginación

Definition of wild in:

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Word of the day mandíbula
f
jaw …
Cultural fact of the day

Today is Fiesta de Santiago (St James' Day). The famous Camino de Santiago, the pilgrimage of thousands of people from all over Spain and many other parts of Europe to the holy city of Santiago de Compostela, takes place in the week leading up to St James' Day, 25 July. The city also has its fiestas around this time. The streets are full of musicians and performers for two weeks of celebrations culminating in the Festival del Apóstol.

There are 3 translations of wild in Spanish:

wild3

n

u
  • the wild how to survive in the wild cómo sobrevivir lejos de la civilización the call of the wild el atractivo de la naturaleza an opportunity to observe these animals in the wild una oportunidad de observar estos animales en libertad or en su hábitat natural they bought a house out in the wilds [humorístico/humorous] se compraron una casa donde el diablo perdió el poncho or (Esp) en el quinto pino [familiar/colloquial]

Definition of wild in:

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Word of the day mandíbula
f
jaw …
Cultural fact of the day

Today is Fiesta de Santiago (St James' Day). The famous Camino de Santiago, the pilgrimage of thousands of people from all over Spain and many other parts of Europe to the holy city of Santiago de Compostela, takes place in the week leading up to St James' Day, 25 July. The city also has its fiestas around this time. The streets are full of musicians and performers for two weeks of celebrations culminating in the Festival del Apóstol.