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wither

Pronunciation: /ˈwɪðər; ˈwɪðə(r)/

Translation of wither in Spanish:

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [plant/flower] marchitarse; [limb] atrofiarse; [hopes] desvanecerse*; [enthusiasm] decaer*
    Example sentences
    • The pressure not to split the team into warring camps during such a season was withering, and it fell on both of them.
    • Phil Fontaine and Jane Stewart's Gathering Strength initiative began to wither.
    • For creativity is a muscle that must be worked or it will gradually atrophy and wither.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [plant/leaves] marchitar; [limb] atrofiar, debilitar; [strength] mermar
    Example sentences
    • A slow descent into a long and murky winter; on my doorstep, the colourful leaves on the trees withered and fell, and there was no spring.
    • The same tree withers, droops and drops the dead leaves in autumn.
    • The plant's foliage withers back during the summer while pretty, orange-red berries appear in the fall.
    Example sentences
    • For the body withering under the polluted skies of the City, with all the energies drained by the daily rigmarole of life, this is manna from heaven!
    • His body was wrinkled and withered, slightly bent over and hunched.
    • He was dressed in only a pair of boxer shorts, his body withered and pale.
    Example sentences
    • It is not anti-Semitic, but it is about anti-Semitism and how the prejudice withers its perpetrators as well as their victims.
    • There are so many things that wither and devour the flesh.
    • Kelly was a conservative columnist known for withering criticisms of former president Bill Clinton and his vice president Al Gore, and also worked for the New Republic and Atlantic Monthly magazines.

Definition of wither in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.