Translation of wither in Spanish:

wither

Pronunciation: /ˈwɪðər; ˈwɪðə(r)/

vi

  • [plant/flower] marchitarse; [limb] atrofiarse; [hopes] desvanecerse*; [enthusiasm] decaer*
    More example sentences
    • The pressure not to split the team into warring camps during such a season was withering, and it fell on both of them.
    • Phil Fontaine and Jane Stewart's Gathering Strength initiative began to wither.
    • For creativity is a muscle that must be worked or it will gradually atrophy and wither.

vt

  • [plant/leaves] marchitar; [limb] atrofiar, debilitar; [strength] mermar
    More example sentences
    • A slow descent into a long and murky winter; on my doorstep, the colourful leaves on the trees withered and fell, and there was no spring.
    • The same tree withers, droops and drops the dead leaves in autumn.
    • The plant's foliage withers back during the summer while pretty, orange-red berries appear in the fall.
    More example sentences
    • For the body withering under the polluted skies of the City, with all the energies drained by the daily rigmarole of life, this is manna from heaven!
    • His body was wrinkled and withered, slightly bent over and hunched.
    • He was dressed in only a pair of boxer shorts, his body withered and pale.
    More example sentences
    • It is not anti-Semitic, but it is about anti-Semitism and how the prejudice withers its perpetrators as well as their victims.
    • There are so many things that wither and devour the flesh.
    • Kelly was a conservative columnist known for withering criticisms of former president Bill Clinton and his vice president Al Gore, and also worked for the New Republic and Atlantic Monthly magazines.

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